A 2 Billion Light Year Pie to Wish you Happy Thanksgiving

Here’s a pie (diagram) to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving!

orangepie

The SDSS’s map of the Universe shown as a pie diagram. Each dot is a galaxy; the colour indicates the local density (with red revealing the most dense places). This represents a slice through the Universe, with the Earth in the centre and galaxies further from the Earth plotted further from the centre (the distance is labelled here as redshift). The angle around the pie is marked by the sky co-ordinates (Right Ascension).

This pie diagram is one of the most famous images from the original phase of SDSS, which mapped the distances to 1 million galaxies out to a distance of about 2 billion light years (z=0.15, or 615 Mpc in comoving radius).

The map shows a slice through the Universe with the Earth at the centre, and each of the 1 million galaxies in the SDSS Main Galaxy Sample as a point. The points are colour coded by local density to hi-light the cosmic web  (with red points in the highest densities).

The black parts of the pie are where SDSS did not map galaxies, either because our Milky Way is blocking the view from Earth, or because those parts of the Universe are not visible from our telescope in New Mexico.

Even while the Universe is expanding, all the matter in it clumps due to gravity and the structures we see in this map are the result of that. The details of the growth of these structures over time depends on both the expansion history of the Universe and the total amount of matter in it. So by accurately mapping the locations of galaxies in this map, scientists in SDSS have been able to measure both of these things making an important contribution to our knowledge of how the Universe works.

Visit our website for more on the science results from SDSS.

SDSS in the News (Aug-Nov 2014)

Back in mid August I set up a Google alert search on “sloan digital sky surveys”. Here is a summary of 3 months of mentions of SDSS in online news:

August 21st: Discovery of one of the oldest stars in the Universe, SDSS J0018-0939, illustrated with SDSS image of the star:
Space Fellowship.com, IBTimes, KRWG.org

Oldeststar

An optical image of the star SDSS J0018-0939, obtained by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This is a low-mass star with a mass about half that of the Sun; the distance to this star is about 1000 light years; its location in the sky is close to the constellation Cetus. (Credit: SDSS/NAOJ)

 

 

Sept 10th, 21st: A report on looking for patterns in the properties of quasars using SDSS spectra:
Arstechnica.com, ScienceCodex.com.

Sept 25th: Discovery of ‘hyper-compact star clusters’ helped by SDSS data: SpartanDaily

Oct 3rd: “Artificial Intelligence Opens a New Window to the Universe”, Huffington Post.

“Robotic telescopes constantly collect astronomical data and generate enormous astronomical databases. For instance, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has imaged over 400 million galaxies since it saw first light in 2000. “

So obviously this mentions SDSS, but implies it’s a robotic telescope!  Our team of observers, plate pluggers, and drillers, and the hundreds of other people who work hard to keep SDSS observing might object to this….

D120330_07_PlugCrewAfter100kFibers.500

In March 2012, BOSS observed 103,000 spectra, each of which was routed through a fiber-optic cable that was plugged by hand. The industrious APO plugging crew is pictured here showing the deleterious effects of having placed more than 2,000 fibers/finger in a month. But don’t worry, they recovered have continued to plug every fibre optic by hand during the day at APO – they might even be doing it as you read this! (Image Credit: Dan Long, APO).

Amazing that our observing process is so smooth that to outsiders it appears to be like a robot! Stay tuned for a newly planned “The SDSS Telescope is not Robotic” article. :)

Oct 8th:
Opinion: “Why More Inventions Don’t Win Nobel Prizes, and Why That’s a Good Thing”, National Geographic.

Cites SDSS as one of the reasons it was right that the invention of the CCD got the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics because of the realms of discovery it opened up:

“The world could get along well without camera cell phones. What’s exciting about CCDs, whose inventors won the 2009 physics prize, is their use in the Hubble Space Telescope and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.”

Oct 10th: “New Study of Spiral Arms”, Phys.org

Authors use a sample of 50 non-barred and two armed spiral galaxies selected from SDSS and measure spiral arm pitch angles, finding most are only approximately log spiral, typically having decreasing pitch angle as radius increased. Link to paper.

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NGC 3338, a non-barred two armed spiral in the study. Credit: SDSS.

 

 

Oct 17th: “A 3D Map of true Adolescent Universe”, SpatialNews, RDMag, Nature World News.
Discussion of plans for new redshift surveys mentions SDSS as “The first big 3D map of the universe”:

Oct 22nd: “Chandra Data Archive Comes to Life”, RedOrbit

Report on release of images from the Chandra archive, which us SDSS images (among many others) to make nice multi wavelength images, like the below one of NGC 4736.

NGC 4736 (also known as Messier 94) is a spiral galaxy that is unusual because it has two ring structures. This galaxy is classified as containing a “low ionization nuclear emission region,” or LINER, in its center, which produces radiation from specific elements such as oxygen and nitrogen. Chandra observations (gold) of NGC 4736, seen in this composite image with infrared data from Spitzer (red) and optical data from Hubble and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (blue), suggest that the X-ray emission comes from a recent burst of star formation. Part of the evidence comes from the large number of point sources near the center of the galaxy, showing that strong star formation has occurred. In other galaxies, evidence points to supermassive black holes being responsible for LINER properties. Chandra’s result on NGC 4736 shows LINERs may represent more than one physical phenomenon. (X-ray: NASA/CXC/Universita di Bologna/S.Pellegrini et al, IR: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Optical: SDSS & NASA/STScI)

NGC 4736 (also known as Messier 94) is a spiral galaxy that is unusual because it has two ring structures. This galaxy is classified as containing a “low ionization nuclear emission region,” or LINER, in its center, which produces radiation from specific elements such as oxygen and nitrogen. Chandra observations (gold) of NGC 4736, seen in this composite image with infrared data from Spitzer (red) and optical data from Hubble and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (blue), suggest that the X-ray emission comes from a recent burst of star formation. Part of the evidence comes from the large number of point sources near the center of the galaxy, showing that strong star formation has occurred. In other galaxies, evidence points to supermassive black holes being responsible for LINER properties. Chandra’s result on NGC 4736 shows LINERs may represent more than one physical phenomenon. (X-ray: NASA/CXC/Universita di Bologna/S.Pellegrini et al, IR: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Optical: SDSS & NASA/STScI)

 

Oct 27th: “Nothing Can Escape Black Holes – this Lucky Star Did”, TechTimes
Study which revealed a star loosing a portion of its mass to a black hole used some SDSS data.

Oct 31st: “Universe May Face a Darker Future”, PhysOrg, TechTimes, Digital Journal.

Cosmologists use galaxies observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to study the nature of dark energy and find support for a scenario in which dark matter decays into dark energy.

Nov 4th: “The Rise of Astrostatistics”, Symmetry Magazine.

“I believe the large surveys shocked astronomers with how much data there is,” Hilbe says. “The Sloan Digital Sky Survey [one of the first automated and digitized comprehensive astronomical sky surveys] told them they needed statistics.”

Notice another mention of SDSS applying the process is automated, which we addressed above (thanks again to our wonderful observing team). Apparently this idea is fairly ubiquitous in the media….

astrostatistics_header_Artwork by Sandbox Studio, Chicago with Kimberly Boustead

Neat illustration of astrostatistic: Artwork by Sandbox Studio, Chicago with Kimberly Boustead for Symmetry Magazine article.

 

 

Nov 6th:  “Never has so much data been collected so fast” Edmonton Journal.
Article about big data in astronomy begins:

“When the Sloan Digital Sky Survey began in 2000, its telescope in New Mexico collected more data in its first few weeks than had been amassed in the entire history of astronomy.”

Nov 7th: “Exploring the Murky Centers of Dust Shrouded Galaxies”, PhysOrg, Science World Report.

Articles use an SDSS image to illustrate the LMT pointing at galaxy 5MUSES-229, one of the dusty galaxies in the study which was used to study the relative contributions of AGN and star formation in the heating of dust.

usandmexican

The LMT pointed at 5MUSES-229, a galaxy approximately one billion light years distant from the Milky Way. With the LMT, astronomers are able to observe the carbon monoxide emission from this galaxy. Credit: James Lowenthal, the background image showing the galaxy is from SDSS.

 

Nov 14th: “How Young, Massive, Compact Galaxies Evolve into Their Red, Dead Elders”, Science World Report.

Report on study using a sample of poststarburst galaxies identified in SDSS and followed up with HST and Chandra.

 


 

 

To set up your own alert, visit news.google.com, search on “sloan digital sky survey” and click “Create alert” which can be found at the bottom on the page.

 

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SDSS Researcher Awarded for Outstanding Research

Prof. Shirley Ho, an assistant professor at the Department of Physics in Carnegie Mellon University and a member of both BOSS and eBOSS science teams has been awarded the 2014 Macronix Prize (or the Outstanding Young Researcher Award) of the International Organization of Chinese Physicists and Astronomers.

Prof. Shirley Ho, Carnegie Mellon University.

Prof. Shirley Ho, Carnegie Mellon University.

The OYRA (Macronix Prize) is given each year to one to two young, ethnic Chinese physicist/astronomer outside of Asia, in recognition of their outstanding achievements in physics/astronomy. The Award carries a cash prize of US $2,000 each and a certificate citing the awardee’s accomplishments in research.

The citation for Prof. Ho’s award explains:

“Much of the research accomplishment of Professor Ho has been on using SDSS-III data to measure cosmic distance scales and the growth of structure in the universe in order to get at the expansion history of the universe. She has been a leader in extracting signals of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, which are the tiny ripples in the density of galaxies that are an imprint left over from the quantum fluctuations in density soon after the Big Bang. She utilized these signals as a standard ruler to measure the distance scale of the universe in various epochs, and was able to achieve the most accurate measurements of cosmic distances yet with an accuracy of 1%. Her current research focuses on developing the understanding of dark energy via large-scale spectroscopy, investigating the initial conditions and contents of the universe large-scale photometry, and applying machine learning to studying non-linear cosmological problems.

Prof. Ho will collect her award at the next meeting of the American Physical Society (San Antonio, Texas, March 2-6th 2015) at which there will also be hosted a meeting of the US-China Young Physicsts Forum.

The SDSS Collaboration congratulates Shirley on both her excellent research and being recognised for it in this way.

The Future is Now: Karen Masters Wins UK Award

Dr. Karen Masters, senior lecturer at the University of Portsmouth’s Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation and Director of Public Education and Outreach for SDSS-IV, has won the Women of the Future Science award. The Women of the Future Awards acknowledge successful young women in Britain and are handed out in fields ranging from business to arts and culture to science and technology. Karen (as we like to call her) received the award for her work
on understanding how galaxies form and evolve over the history of the universe. Karen uses a diverse set of tools, including the contributions of large number of citizen scientists looking at SDSS images of galaxies at the Galaxy Zoo (www.galaxyzoo.org) and the new data coming from the MaNGA survey of SDSS-IV (http://www.sdss.org/sdss-surveys/manga/). Karen is also one of the BBC’s “100 Women of 2014″, invited to share her thoughts and experiences as part of the BBC’s pledge to represent women better in their news reporting.

 

Dr. Masters accepting the award from the Rt Hon John Bercow MP,  Speaker of the House of Commons.

Dr. Masters accepting her award from the Rt Hon John Bercow MP, Speaker of the House of Commons, and Trui Hebbelink from Shell. 

For more information, see http://www.ras.org.uk/news-and-press/2527-dr-karen-masters-wins-women-of-the-future-award and http://www.bbc.com/news/world-29758792

Observing the Partial Solar Eclipse with an SDSS Plate

An SDSS plate was reused to wonderful effect this week, as a pinhole camera to project 640 simultaneous images of the recent partial solar eclipse on 23rd October 2014.

Sarah Ballard (@hubbahubble) and Woody Sullivan, from SDSS member institution, the University of Washington in Seattle came up with this unique idea to observe the solar eclipse.

SDSS1-270x360

Putting an SDSS plate to use as an eclipse viewer. Credit: Sarah Ballard and Woody Sullivan (Univ. of Washington).

SDSS2-270x360

640 images of the 23rd October 2014 partial solar eclipse. Credit: Woody Sullivan and Sarah Ballard (Univ. of Washington).

For more lovely or unusual eclipse photos, see this Solar Eclipse Roundup, by Sky and Telescope, who selected Sarah and Woody’s method as their “best use of old technology” for viewing the eclipse.

SDSS member Brice Ménard Awarded Prestigious Packard Fellowship

SDSS congratulates Dr. Brice Ménard (Johns Hopkins University) on receiving a David and Lucille Packard Foundation Fellowship.  This $850,000, five-year grant is awarded to “the nation’s most promising early-career scientists and engineers” — only 18 such awards were given this year.  Dr. Ménard specializes in applying advance statistical techniques to large data sets to explore the distribution of galaxies and matter in the Universe.  Much of his work has exploited the rich data of SDSS and we look forward to seeing the future ideas and science to come out of this award.

For more details see the JHU press release at

http://hub.jhu.edu/2014/10/15/brice-menard-packard-fellowship

 

 

 

SDSS hits the Big time

SDSS has made it big! How big? The Big 12! To explain a little more, especially for those who are not American college football fans, the Big 12 is a group of universities* that form a league in American college football. During broadcasts of college football games, which are very popular, there are a couple of advertisements that highlight the universities’ educational and research prowess. Usually these involve good-looking students with colorful liquids in test tubes or surrounding a professor in a lab coat at a computer terminal. But that’s not good enough for TCU, home to SDSS members Kat Barger and SDSS-IV Survey Coordinator Peter Frinchaboy. Their contribution to the Big 12 ad, on a broadcast seen by over 2 million people, features a shot of the Sloan Foundation telescope opening up for a night’s observing. TCU also has its own ad for these games, which focuses entirely on its involvement in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, including more beautiful shots of the Sloan Foundation Telescope in New Mexico and a “starring” role for Peter. Take a look at http://www.big12makingadifference.com/university/tcu

* 10 universities are part of the Big 12. Don’t ask.

SDSS Tweep of the Week: Demitri Muna

Tweeting for SDSS this week is Demitri Muna, research scientist at Ohio State University. Demitri is interested in galaxy evolution and is currently working on a new stellar population synthesis code. He is designing an ambitious project called Trillian, an all-sky, multi-wavelength astronomy computational engine. Trillian was included in last week’s launch of a new project called Collaborate on Science, part of Mozilla’s Science Lab, and has support from the Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics department at OSU. Demitri is interested in scientific data visualization and tools, and has played a significant role in web services for SDSS data. In his free time, Demitri also designs all of the plates for the SDSS survey and is an avid curler.

SDSS Plates

The SDSS has used thousands of plug plates in its fourteen year history. These are large aluminium plates into which tiny holes are drilled. Each hole has an optical fibre plugged into it (by hand by our plate pluggers). Each hole corresponds to the sky location where there is an object (a star or a galaxy) which SDSS wants to measure a spectrum for.

During SDSS spectroscopic observations, between six and nine of these are used every night. Each plate is custom drilled for a special part of the sky (about the size of your palm stretched out at arms length), and once all the data is collected for the astronomical objects in that plate, it becomes surplus to requirements.

All SDSS Collaboration members can request that used plates be sent to them (contact your Collaboration Council Representative for assistance with this). This has resulted in some interesting uses for the leftover plates across our diverse collaboration.

You might like to mount your plates on the wall for display.

A wall mounted plate at the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Portsmouth, UK.

A wall mounted plate at the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Portsmouth, UK. Image credit: Karen Masters

SDSS plates on display at CCAPP (Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics), Ohio State University. Image credit: Qingqing Mao.

SDSS plates on display at CCAPP (Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics), Ohio State University. Image credit: Qingqing Mao.

If doing this, it is helpful to have a good description as a guide. This is especially helpful if you are donating a plate to a local science museum or other location away from SDSS collaboration members who know what it is. The example below was made for a display of plate 825 by Jordan Raddick from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

plate825_small

To make a version of Jordan’s information sheet tailored for your own plate you can find the sky co-ordinates of your plate in this List of plate observation dates and centres. Then visit the Skyserver Navigate Tool to find an image at this location. You will likely want to invert the images, zoom out to the second largest scale, and overlay the plate location (all under “Drawing Options” to the right of the screen). You can then use Google sky to work out roughly which constellation this plate is in (unless you happen to know!), and the constellation maps are available from the IAU. To convert the MJD of observation to something understandable you might like this MJD converter.

We have a second example of plate display information from David Kirkby at UC Irvine. Here David has made an overlay of the SDSS imaging and coloured marks corresponding to the holes in BOSS plate 6640 (green for galaxies and purple for quasars), as well as an 3D representation of the distances to these objects (based on their SDSS measured redshifts).

An overlay for Plate 6640 showing both SDSS imaging and the location of drilled holes (green = galaxies; purple = quasars). Image credit: David Kirkby.

An overlay for Plate 6640 showing both SDSS imaging and the location of drilled holes (green = galaxies; purple = quasars). Image credit: David Kirkby.

A visualisation of the 3D structure behind BOSS plate 6640 based on redshifts measured by SDSS. Image credit: David Kirkby.

A visualisation of the 3D structure behind BOSS plate 6640 based on redshifts measured by SDSS. Image credit: David Kirkby.

It’s possible to back light wall mounted plates in some circumstances, to really nice effect. The below example was made by Mark Klaene at Apache Point Observatory.

KlaeneMount

Mounted in the corner of Mark Klaene’s office at APO. It is spray painted black with a fluorescent desk lamp back light.

If you’re lucky you might find a natural source of light for this effect, as in this example where Stephen Bailey from LBL has mounted a plate in the window in his office door.

OfficeDoor

SDSS Plate in an Office Door (the hole was there already).

Several collaboration members have used plates to make special coffee tables, or coffee table covers.

The most basic version of this is just placing a plate on top of a round coffee table of similar diameter.

ICG_coffeetable

Coffee table topper by Bob Nichol, ICG Portsmouth.

This second one uses a 36″ round glass top table topped with a plate. Bumpers have been added to the plate and the normal glass top placed on top of it. The lighting shown below is from a single puck from a modular LED lighting system.

PlateTableBCLee.png

Coffee table with under lighting by Brian Lee from SDSS-II.

At JHU they have made two coffee tables with the SDSS plates. The base is a hollow box made from scratch of four wood pieces and there is a lamp inside so at night you can see the light shining through the slits.

SDSSPlate_CoffeeTable1_small

Custom coffee table at JHU. Credit: Ting-Wen Lan, Murdock Hart, Guangtun Zhu and Brice Ménard. Photo courtesy of Zheng (Jared) Zheng.

SDSS Plug Plate Coffee Tables in use at JHU. Image credit: Gail Zasowski

SDSS Plug Plate Coffee Tables in use at JHU. Image credit: Gail Zasowski

Plates have also been used to make lab demos. The below is an example set up which LBL has to give quick demos.

LBLDemoPlate1

SDSS Plate Demo at LBL.

SDSS plates have also been used to make works of art. The most well know is work by Josiah McElheny in collaboration with David Weinberg (also described here and in this NYTimes Article).

Sculpture by Josiah McElheny using SDSS plug plate. Image provided by David Weinberg.

Sculpture by Josiah McElheny using SDSS plug plate. Image provided by David Weinberg.sdss

 

Sarah Ruether, an artist from Seattle and London based artist Xavier Poultney have also made artwork using plates.

Public art by Sarah Ruether made from SDSS-II plug plates

Public art by Sarah Ruether made from SDSS-II plug plates

Plate Artwork by Xavier Poultney as part of his Transient Objects exhibit.

Plate Artwork by Xavier Poultney as part of his Transient Objects exhibit.

If you have other examples of interesting uses of SDSS plates please let us know about them by commenting below, or emailing outreach@sdss.org.

See how the plates are drilled at the SDSS Plate Drilling Labs at the University of Washington in Seattle:

See how the optical fibres are plugged into a BOSS plate by our awesome SDSS plate pluggers (at Apache Point Observatory):

SDSS Tweep of the Week: Qingqing Mao

This week’s tweeter is Qingqing Mao, a graduate student at Vanderbilt University.
Qingqing has a wide range of research interests spanning from the structure of our Milky Way to the very large-scale structure of our universe. He has used both SEGUE and BOSS data for his research. Currently his main project is looking at how to identify cosmic voids – which are large underdense regions with very few galaxies – in BOSS data and use them to study cosmology.
Qingqing Mao

Qingqing Mao

Qingqing also participates in SDSS EPO, especially including social network activities and multilingual efforts. He leads our efforts to keep the SDSS Chinese facebook page and SDSS Chinese Weibo updated.
Qingqing has also developed an astronomy iPhone ap, which allows users to explore data of the Cosmic Microwave Background: CMB Maps.
He regularly tweets as @maoqingqing and his personal website can be found at http://mqq.io/.

SDSS Tweep of the Week: Jonathan Bird

This week’s SDSS tweeter is Jonathan Bird, current the VIDA (Vanderbilt Inititative in Intensive Data Astrophysics) postdoctoral fellow at Vanderbilt University, and Co-Chair of the Disk Science Working Group for APOGEE.

Jonathan Bird

Jonathan Bird

 

Jonathan received his PhD in 2012 from the Ohio State University. His thesis focused on using numerical simulations to look for patterns in the dynamics and chemistry of the stars in disk galaxies which can be linked to specific evolution and formation mechanisms. He has used both APOGEE and SEGUE data to search for such signatures in our own Milky Way Galaxy.

Jonathan is currently working on generating mock APOGEE catalogs from simulated disk galaxies. Of the SDSS surveys, he is most connected with APOGEE, where he is co-chair of the disk science working group, but he is also hoping to get more involved with MaNGA soon.

Jonathan regularly tweets as @galaxyhistorian and has been working on some awesome visualisations of the APOGEE and SEGUE data sets, so keep your fingers cross for a sneak peek this week.

SDSS Tweep of the Week: Isabelle Paris

This week the Sloan Foundation 2.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory will reopen and start observing for the new season. Did you know that all SDSS Collaboration members can sign up for nightly notifications of what the telescope has been observing?

The tweeter for this exciting week in the annual life of SDSS will be Isabelle Paris from the Osservatorio astronomico di Trieste (Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, Italy). Isabelle has been an SDSS member since she started working on her PhD with Patrick Petitjean at the IAP (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, France). The topic of her thesis was the cosmological evolution of the opacity of the intergalactic medium, which Isabelle studied using SDSS-DR7 and BOSS data. Following this Isabelle has a 2 year postdoc at the Universidad de Chile, and is now an External Participant of the SDSS Collaboration based in Trieste.

Isabelle Paris pictured here hard at work as a collaboration meeting in Pittsburgh in July 2010.

Isabelle Paris pictured here hard at work as a collaboration meeting in Pittsburgh in July 2010.

Isabelle is the Chair of the (SDSS-III) quasar science working-group and is also in charge of generating the quasar catalogues for SDSS. So I think we can expect to hear a lot about supermassive black holes and very high redshift sources this week.

Above,  Isabelle is pictured in July 2010 attending a BOSS Lyman-alpha Forest and Quasar Working Groups meeting in Pittsburgh.

SDSS Tweep of the Week: John Parejko

This week the SDSS is preparing for our telescope at Apache Point Observatory to come out of its usual 4 week summer vacation shutdown and get back to observing.

This period of shutdown is a very busy one for SDSS operations when a lot of essential maintenance happens. For example this year the primary mirror of the telescope has been given a new reflective coating. The timing of the shut down is set to coincide with the monsoon season in the South West of the USA – a period when the weather is often not good for observing anyway.

As part of the process of re-opening, SDSS Operations Software Guru John Parejko (who is usually based at Yale University in New Haven, CT) will travel out to APO. John has agreed to tweet what’s going on for us as our “Tweep of the week” while the telescope gets ready to start observing again.

John Parejko in front of the Sloan 2.5m Telescope at Apache Point Observatory.

John Parejko in front of the Sloan 2.5m Telescope at Apache Point Observatory.

John got his PhD in physics in 2010 from Drexel University where he used SDSS data to study the topic of Low Luminosity Active Galaxies (ie. how supermassive black holes which are only accreting a little bit work). Following this he was a postdoc at Yale University working on the BOSS (Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Spectrosopice Survey) data, before taking over responsibility for the SDSS telescope operations software two years ago.

John’s an example of someone whose been in the SDSS family for a while!

SDSS Collaboration Meetings in Park City, Utah, USA

Over 150 scientists from institutions in 13 countries in Europe, Asia, North America and South America recently traveled to Park City, Utah for the SDSS Collaboration meetings. First SDSS-IV got underway. The start of SDSS-IV observations on July 1, 2014 meant that this meeting was much less anticipatory and much more participatory than the SDSS-IV meeting last year. For the second half of the week, the SDSS-III collaboration, data all taken, was focused on the interesting science results coming out of this very successful 6-year survey. The overlap between the membership of the SDSS-IV and SDSS-III collaborations is quite large, so expect to see many of the faces in the photo from the SDSS-III half of the meeting in the future as well! Our enthusiastic thanks to the University of Utah for playing host to such a fabulous set of meetings.

SDSS-III collaboration meeting picture from the wonderful setting of Park City, Utah

SDSS-III collaboration meeting picture from the wonderful setting of Park City, Utah

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